How to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary. Notes on Chapter 8 from To Kill a Mockingbird 2019-01-28

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Summary

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Summary Scout, the narrator, remembers the summer that her brother Jem broke his arm, and she looks back over the years to recall the incidents that led to that climactic event. The value of some freedoms can't be fully understood until a person is forced to part from them. The minor hardships that start the summer foreshadow the much bigger dilemmas that the children will face during Tom's trial and its aftermath. Atticus, amused and impressed, insisted that they try to disguise the resemblance by dressing it up with straw hat and garden shears. Radley about it, and he claims the tree is dying and filling the knothole with cement will keep it alive. Like the Finches: , her brother Jem, and their father Atticus. Ewell himself could've beaten Mayella.

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Book Summary

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Miss Maudie is honest in her speech and her ways, with a witty tongue, and Scout considers her a trusted friend. Scout agrees and Atticus reads to her and Jem from the papers. Jem went to the Kitchen and got a broom. Calpurnia's ability to speak both the English of the white community and of the black community shows one aspect of her role as a mediator between the otherwise far-removed worlds of black and white. Atticus mentions that Scout also needs to learn not to get so angry over things because it will only get more difficult as the trial approaches. Atticus appreciates what Heck is trying to do, but he doesn't want anyone to cover for Jem.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Summary

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Scout and Jem learn some impressive things about their father — things that will ultimately help them understand why Atticus is compelled to defend Tom Robinson. She and Dill are posted as guards, while Jem tries to deliver the note, but Atticus intervenes, telling the children to leave the Radleys alone. One does not love breathing. This first introduction of Aunt Alexandra presents her as a dominating and traditional presence with strong opinions about how Scout ought to behave. Atticus makes the two children wait by the Radley house so they are well out of the way. In general, those who are usually seen and described as being willfully inside the house: Mrs. He is scholarly and wears glasses, where most fathers in their community hunt and fish.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 4

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Later, she and Dill discuss why Boo Radley has never run away — he surely must not feel wanted. The children comfort her and she reads them a story. Dubose's house and apologize to her in person. Scout and Jem's surprise helps readers understand this unfairness at a deeper level. Shortly after Jem is relieved from duty, Mrs. The Gray Ghost One in a series of pulp fiction novels written in 1926 by Robert Schulkers. Lee provides an interesting look at the issue of femininity in these chapters.

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To Kill a Mockingbird: To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

However, just as every white resident of Maycomb isn't prejudiced, not every member of Calpurnia's church is, either. She thought it was a snake and she walked over to Jems room and quietly knocked on his door and asked Jem what a snake felt like and told him that she thought one was under her bed. Avery, and Atticus is dismayed at the likeness. The dog is so close to the Radley house that a stray bullet might go into the building. Boo's gifts also suggest a fondness for children.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Flashcards

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Avery is so strong that Atticus demands that they disguise it. In the kitchen, Atticus asks Calpurnia to accompany him to give the news to Tom's wife, Helen. That night, Atticus wakes Scout and helps her put on her bathrobe and coat and goes outside with her and Jem. Lee sets everything up beautifully by turning the story into a mystery of sorts, using foreshadowing to provide the reader with clues to the resolution. The story starts with the first summer that Scout and Jem meet Dill, a little boy from Meridian, Mississippi who spends the summers with his aunt, the Finchs' next-door neighbor Miss Rachel Haverford. Aunt Alexandra chastises him for remarking that Mr. Atticus tells Scout that he has been asked to be Tom Robinson's lawyer, a black man who has been accused of raping a white woman.

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To Kill a Mockingbird: Summary & Analysis Part 1: Chapters 8

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

While everyone hunkers down, the sheriff gives Atticus his gun, asking him to shoot the dog. The reader cannot help feeling sympathy towards him. Scout, Jem, and Dill come to question these conventions as the story progresses. However, if they convict Tom, they do so knowing that they're sentencing an innocent man to death. Jem is dumbstruck with the accuracy of his father's shot.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Flashcards

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Bravery takes on a new role as the children face the mob threatening Atticus at the jail. Jem explains that he's never been whipped by Atticus and doesn't want to be. Scout then asks her why they don't have hymnbooks at her church, and Calpurnia explains that only a few people at the church can read. A swept yard was typically kept neat and clean using straw sagebrush brooms. The Cunninghams must keep the farm running in order to survive, and because the school system does not make any accommodations for farm children, there is a self-perpetuating societal cycle for farm families to remain uneducated and ignorant.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Fire trucks arrive after that; unfortunately, they are unable to stop her house from burning down, but they do prevent other houses nearby from catching fire as well. In the process, Aunt Alexandra hurts Scout's feelings horribly, prompting Jem to guess why Boo Radley chooses to stay inside. In some ways their snowman is analogous to the way blacks are treated in Maycomb. Dubose's house every afternoon and read to her. When it remains in the hole for a few days, they take it, and decide that anything left there is okay to take.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Atticus tells Jem and Scout that patterns of history, family, identity, and temperament, both new and old, help make an individual. Underwood underscores the town's immaturity and callousness when it comes to racial issues. In Chapter 8, Maycomb receives some unexpected snowfall. The open-minded children run outside constantly, and Dill in particular has no house of his own, making him extremely free. The next morning, the day the trial is set to begin, Atticus and Scout talk about mob mentality, and, over Aunt Alexandra's protests, he thanks the children for appearing when they did.

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