Over the hill to the poor house poem. Over The Hill To The Poor House Poem by Will McKendree Carleton 2019-03-02

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The Notorious Meddler: Over The Hill To The Poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

Even though poor-houses began to disappear after the adoption of the Social Security program in the 1930s, some people wonder how far we've come from a time when poor people were simply thrown away. I am ready and willin' an' anxious any day To work for a decent livin' and pay my honest way; For I can earn my victuals, an' more too, I'll be bound, If anybody is willin' to only have me 'round. But the keenest grief I ever felt Was when my mother beside me knelt, An' cried an' prayed, till I melted down, As I wouldn't for half the horses in town. I am willin' and anxious an' ready any day. August 8, 1900 - An old man whose name was Sloane, and who had been in the poor-house for several years, died last Sunday morning.

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Catalog Record: Over the hill to the poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

I gave them the house they were born in A deed to the farm and more I gave them the place that they lived on And now I am turned from its door 4. An' then I wrote to Rebecca, my girl who lives out West, And to Isaac, not far from her--some twenty miles at best; And one of 'em said 'twas too warm there for any one so old, And t'other had an opinion the climate was too cold. — I ’d have died for my daughters, I ’d have died for my sons; And God he made that rule of love; but when we ’re old and gray, I ’ve noticed it sometimes somehow fails to work the other way. And a very little cottage one family will do, But I never have seen a mansion that was big enough for two. Over the hill to the poor-house-it seems so horrid queer! Still I was bound to struggle, an' never cringe or fall--- Still I worked for Charley, for Charley was now my all; And Charley was pretty good to me, with scarce a word or frown, Till at last he went a-courtin', and brought a wife from town. She has heretofore filled the position, giving entire satisfaction.

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Over the Hill to the Poorhouse

over the hill to the poor house poem

The fire in 1869 completely gutted the stone house, but its walls still held. Strange, another thing: when our boys an' girls was grown, And when, exceptin' Charley, they'd left us there alone; When John he nearer an' nearer come, an' dearer seemed to be, The Lord of Hosts he come one day an' took him away from me. But it's possible to lose everything. True, I am not so supple, nor yet so awful stout; But charity ain't no favor, if one can live without. The 1920 silent film is preserved at Bois d'Arcy in France. Am I lazy or crazy? So we worked for the child’rn, and raised ’em every one; Worked for ’em summer and winter, just as we ought to ’ve done; Only perhaps we humored ’em, which some good folks condemn, But every couple’s child’rn ’s heap the best to them. I am willin' and anxious an' ready any day To work for a decent livin', an' pay my honest way; For I can earn my victuals, an' more too, I'll be bound, If any body only is willin' to have me round.

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Catalog Record: Over the hill to the poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

So 'twas only a few days before the thing was done-- They was a family of themselves, and I another one; And a very little cottage one family will do, But I never have seen a house that was big enough for two. True, I am not so supple, nor yet so awful stout. The film starred actress and almost all of her real-life children. Over 330,000 people have visited The Notorious Meddler blog! Over the Hill to the Poor by House by Will Carletonby Over the hill to the poor-house I'm trudgin' my weary way— I, a woman of seventy, and only a trifle gray— I, who am smart an' chipper, for all the years I've told, As many another woman that's only half as old. Strange, another thing: when our boys an’ girls was grown, And when, exceptin’ Charley, they ’d left us there alone; When John he nearer an’ nearer come, an’ dearer seemed to be, The Lord of Hosts he come one day an’ took him away from me.


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The Notorious Meddler: Over The Hill To The Poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

I kissed her fondly, then an' there, An' swore henceforth to be honest and square. It was also anticipated that by forcing people to go to a less than pleasant place if they wanted public assistance, many poor could be discouraged from seeking help. The little boy was sick and had walked himself down, looking more dead than alive. What is the use of heapin' on me a pauper's shame? Am I blind or lame? It was like finding a crystal, clear, cool and refreshing spring in the midst of a dark, dry and dusty desert of thought. Over the hill to the poor-house--I can't quite make it clear! I'd have died for my daughters, I'd have died for my sons; And God he made that rule of love; but when we're old and gray, I've noticed it sometimes, somehow, fails to work the other way. The film was directed by , released by , and was a box office success in 1920.

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OVER THE HILL TO THE POOR HOUSE

over the hill to the poor house poem

But it's possible to lose everything. Am I lazy or crazy? Strange how much we think of our blessed little ones! So they have shirked and slighted me, an’ shifted me about— So they have well-nigh soured me, an’ wore my old heart out; But still I ’ve borne up pretty well, an’ wasn’t much put down, Till Charley went to the poor-master, an’ put me on the town. And when to John I was married, sure he was good and smart, But he and all the neighbors would own I done my part; For life was all before me, an' I was young an' strong, And I worked my best an' smartest in tryin' to get along. Over the hill to the poor-house—it seems so horrid queer! Over the hill to the poor-house---I can't quite make it clear! I am willin' and anxious an' ready any day To work for a decent livin', an' pay my honest way; For I can earn my victuals, an' more too, I'll be bound, If anybody only is willin' to have me round. So ’t was only a few days before the thing was done— They was a family of themselves, and I another one; And a very little cottage one family will do, But I never have seen a house that was big enough for two.

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Over The Hill From The Poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

Tain't no use of boastin', or talkin' over free, But many a house an' home was open then to me; Many a han'some offer I had from likely men, And nobody ever hinted that I was a burden then. An' then I wrote to Rebecca, my girl who lives out West, And to Isaac, not far from her---some twenty miles at best; And one of 'em said 'twas too warm there for anyone so old, And t'other had an opinion the climate was too cold. So we worked for the child'rn, and raised 'em every one; Worked for 'em summer and winter, just as we ought to 've done; Only perhaps we humored 'em, which some good folks condemn, But every couple's child'rn's a heap the best to them. Oh me on the doorstep up yonder I've set with my babe's on my knee No father so happy or fonder Than I of my little ones three. October 12, 1904 - The Adair County Court did a righteous act last week when it elected Mrs. Am I lazy or crazy? An' maybe our ride wasn't pleasant an' gay, An' maybe she wasn't wrapped up that day; An' maybe our cottage wasn't warm an' bright, An' maybe it wasn't a pleasant sight, To see her a-gettin' the evenin's tea, An' frequently stoppin' and kissin' me; An' maybe we didn't live happy for years, In spite of my brothers' and sisters' sneers, Who often said, as I have heard, That they wouldn't own a prison-bird; Though they're gettin' over that, I guess, For all of 'em owe me more or less ; But I've learned one thing; an' it cheers a man In always a-doin' the best he can; That whether, on the big book, a blot Gets over a fellow's name or not, Whenever he does a deed that's white, It's credited to him fair and right. Now some are trying to find and preserve those graves, to provide the dead the dignity they did not have in life.

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Catalog Record: Over the hill to the poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

An' when you hear the great bugle's notes, An' the Lord divides his sheep an' goats; However they may settle my case, Wherever they may fix my place, My good old Christian mother, you'll see, Will be sure to stand right up for me, With over the hill from the poor-house. Many a step I've taken a-toiling to and fro, But this is a sort of journey I never thought to go. Many a night I've watched you when only God was nigh; And God 'll judge between us; but I will al'ays pray That you shall never suffer the half I do to-day. Many a night I've watched you when only God was nigh; And God 'll judge between us; but I will al'ays pray That you shall never suffer the half I do to-day. And when I arrived where I was grown, I took good care that I shouldn't be known; But I bought the old cottage, through and through, Of some one Charley had sold it to; And held back neither work nor gold, To fix it up as it was of old. But charity ain't no favor, if one can live without. As for Susan, her heart was kind An' good--what there was of it, mind; Nothin' too big, an' nothin' too nice, Nothin' she wouldn't sacrifice For one she loved; an' that 'ere one Was herself, when all was said an' done.

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MPR: Over the Hill to the Poor House

over the hill to the poor house poem

The original building was restored and served the poor until 1955. An' Charley an' 'Becca meant well, no doubt, But any one could pull 'em about; An' all o' our folks ranked well, you see, Save one poor fellow, and that was me; An' when, one dark an' rainy night, A neighbor's horse went out o' sight, They hitched on me, as the guilty chap That carried one end o' the halter-strap. So they have shirked and slighted me, an' shifted me about--- So they have well nigh soured me, an' wore my old heart out; But still I've borne up pretty well, an' wasn't much put down, Till Charley went to the poor-master, an' put me on the town! Then there's an accident, an illness, a poor choice. Many a step I've taken, a-toilin' to and fro, But this is a sort of journey I never thought to go. What is the use of heapin’ on me a pauper’s shame? What is the use of heapin' on me a pauper's shame? And so we worked together: and life was hard, but gay, With now and then a baby for to cheer us on our way; Till we had half a dozen, an' all growed clean an' neat, An' went to school like others, an' had enough to eat. One day you have a job, a family, a house.

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the hill to the poor

over the hill to the poor house poem

The county poorfarm was in operation for only 15 years, before it burned in 1869. Once I was young an' han'some--I was, upon my soul-- Once my cheeks was roses, my eyes as black as coal; And I can't remember, in them days, of hearin' people say, For any kind of a reason, that I was in their way. An' maybe our ride wasn't pleasant an' gay, An' maybe she wasn't wrapped up that day; An' maybe our cottage wasn't warm an' bright, An' maybe it wasn't a pleasant sight, To see her a-gettin' the evenin's tea, An' frequently stoppin' and kissin' me; An' maybe we didn't live happy for years, In spite of my brothers' and sisters' sneers, Who often said, as I have heard, That they wouldn't own a prison-bird; Though they're gettin' over that, I guess, For all of 'em owe me more or less ; But I've learned one thing; an' it cheers a man In always a-doin' the best he can; That whether, on the big book, a blot Gets over a fellow's name or not, Whenever he does a deed that's white, It's credited to him fair and right. Once I was young an' han'some—I was upon my soul— Once my cheeks was roses, my eyes as black as coal; And I can't remember, in them days, of hearin' people say, For any kind of a reason, that I was in their way. And when to John I was married, sure he was good and smart, But he and all the neighbors would own I done my part; For life was all before me, an' I was young an' strong, And I worked the best that I could in tryin' to get along. She was somewhat dressy, an' hadn't a pleasant smile - She was quite conceity, and carried a heap o' style; But if ever I tried to be friends, I did with her, I know; But she was hard and proud, an' I couldn't make it go. And when to John I was married, sure he was good and smart, But he and all the neighbors would own I done my part; For life was all before me, an’ I was young an’ strong, And I worked the best that I could in tryin’ to get along.

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